9 Most Common Mistakes when Migrating from Monolith to Microservices

With the microservices architecture gaining a lot of traction in the software world, more and more companies are migrating from their existing monolith to microservices architecture. Typically, this is a wise move, but great care needs to be taken in order to complete this process successfully. Below, we have gathered the nine most common issues we see when working with our customers on monolith to microservices migration.

1. Having nothing to migrate from 

While in some specific systems it might make sense to start development with a microservice architecture, typically it is better to start off with a monolith with well-defined module boundaries and migrate to microservices when the product is more mature. During early development, the approach, requirements, and designs shift a lot. Plus, based on market response, product managers might decide to pursue a different market or niche. Additionally, decision-makers frequently do not have a complete understanding of the requirements from the beginning of the project. read more

8 Problems a Software House Should Take Off a CTO’s Head

Being a CTO is a very fulfilling opportunity. It gives the possibility to shape innovative products in terms of their technology, MVPs and the overall design. Being a CTO means taking full responsibility for the company’s overall development including product management and scalability, tech stack, team growth, and management and often overseeing the next version of the product. All of this might get somewhat overwhelming, and when it does, it might be a good idea to find a partner who can take some of the problems off a CTO’s head. read more

How outsourcing microservices helps to scale tech products

Let’s run through an example scenario. Say a company has their first MVP on the market. It is well-received by the market and brings clients and investors on-board. The product is well-designed and it works, but it has room for improvement. The product has great potential, but V2 needs to be more polished and further development is needed to scale it up. Since the live product may already have a considerable user base, any changes implemented into the system should be done seamlessly and without downtime. The new architecture should be designed in such a way that allows the addition of new functionalities and leaves room for further development. read more

Who should consider migrating to microservices?

The microservice-based approach produces a type of architecture that has a more spread out and unit-focused philosophy than a traditional monolith. Favoring flexibility and scalability, microservices may be the perfect solution for companies that want to quickly bring their systems to the next level. Granted one size does not fit all, so it’s good to keep in mind the intended uses and limitations of any strategy.  If a microservices are a good fit, they can become key to a company’s growth when applied correctly. read more

Success stories of offshoring microservices development to CEE

Why CEE?

Central Eastern Europe (CEE) is an extremely fast-developing part of the world. Many companies have already seen the potential of the region and incorporated it into their development strategies. Both global corporations and start-up companies are bringing their assets to the region; over 2,000 Shared Service Centers (SSCs) are open in the region.  These SSCs employ 640,000 people, many of whom are highly qualified engineers who bring innovative product development strategies to the region. 

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